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“How To Activate Your Racial Curiosity In The Service Of Others" with UF Chief Diversity Officer Antonio Farias - Shared screen with speaker view
Mark Tancig
19:03
Good morning
Anita Neal
21:57
surproized
Melissa Cordero
21:58
Yes I was pretty surprised
Virgilia Zabala
21:59
First time reading about it.
Yang Lin
22:01
Had a chance to read it before.
Tory Moore
22:02
I knew some of the information, but was mostly surprised
Jennifer Sykes
22:04
I actually read this a month or so ago, and I did not know the depth!
Eric Hellgren
22:05
Unfamiliar
Noelle Guay
22:05
Pretty surprised. It was something new to me.
Grace Burmester
22:06
knew it was a thing, but no idea to the extent!
Shirley Baker
22:06
Shocked and sad
Diane Craig
22:07
Surprised, I had never heard any of this. disheartened
Mary Jane Lukas
22:07
Good Morning! Yes, surprised!
Samantha Hsu
22:10
I was surprised by the extent of the Morrill Act
Heather McAuslane
22:10
Absolutely shocked and surprised. Disappointed that our fabulous land grant history started like this.
Max Williams
22:11
yes surprised by the extent of the land taken by the government from the indigenous people
Cecilia Suarez
22:11
not surprised and yet still challenged by it
deborah Rousseau
22:11
Yes surprised at the extent. Knew it exsisited
Ron Rice
22:12
I was shocked, had no idea about the land"grab" history
Susan Webb
22:12
Yes, I was surprised...and was shocked.
Nicole Walker
22:12
New level of info
Kimberly Moore
22:13
Surpirsed
Andrea Emrick
22:14
not surprised
Kirsten Romaguera
22:14
I wasn’t surprised, necessarily, but it was unfamiliar to me.
Susan Percival
22:14
first time
Elaine Turner
22:15
surprised at the scope of land used
Carol Roberts
22:16
I'm part of a team exploring this subject right now. understandable
Wendy Meredith
22:17
Surprised
Carolina Vendrame
22:17
Second time reading about it, heart wrenching
Dévonja Roberts
22:21
Surprised.. heard of some of it though.. not the details of it
Allen Wysocki
22:23
I was surprised to learn the details. It created a lot of cognitive dissonance for me.
Mary Salinas
22:30
had always thought highly of Morrill Act and now....
Patricia Nobles
22:31
Yes I was it always amazes me what and how me think,
Tory Moore
22:31
heartbroken without a doubt
Gail Somodi
22:35
not familiar, not surprised.
Mark Tancig
22:51
same as gail!
Jennifer Sykes
24:34
Yes
Jessica Abbate
24:35
yes
Denise Bogart
24:36
yes
Rebecca Baldwin
35:31
Just a thought for discussion. The researchers followed the land from the 1860s. Wasn’t much of this land already claimed by land grants before the US was formed? That wasn’t discussed in the article, but is something to consider. The land that had once been inhabited by tribal communities had been claimed, in some cases for several hundred years, by the Spanish, French, English, and even Russia before the Morrill Act. It is something to consider since this article skipped several hundred years of history.
ANDRES VARELA
38:23
lol
deborah Rousseau
40:04
Already Google "Cognitive Dissonance" LOL
Dana LeCuyer
40:18
That one's okay, lol.
ANDRES VARELA
40:23
me too Deborah :)
Thomas Ruppert
45:15
It would be great to have a little more exploration of the fact that "race" is a social construct rather than biologically determined as this seems to be a very pervasive belief that those that hold it have difficulty finding their way out of.
Jennifer Sykes
45:48
I think that would be a whole 'nother Zoom webinar unto itself.
Misti Sharp
45:51
I also felt that way about the "Implicit Association Test." I was frustrated at how I could become better which was not clear to me just taking the test out of the blue. As teachers it is troubling to be "slightly ablest" when I really do want to be as accommodating as possible.
Rebecca Baldwin
47:43
To put this indigenous tribes of North America in perspective, the population of the largest state in the US is California with more than 39 million people. Some of the US tribes were mound builders, but South American indigenous tribes built cities. The tribes in the US were actually distributed over vast areas. I was interested in the mound building tribes when I was a child.
Heidi Reever
47:54
The book "White Fragility" addresses race as a social construct.
deborah Rousseau
49:01
White Fragility is a great read. If you are not a reader, she has great talks on YouTube.
Jeanna Mastrodicasa
49:13
If anybody would like to borrow the book "White Fragility" I have read it and have it at my office in McCarty. just let me know, happy to share it around.
Victoria Gibney
51:05
"Me and White Supremacy" by Layla Saad is also really powerful with the goal of moving along that spectrum mentioned earlier. It is written as a workbook and can be done alone or in a small group.
Nicole Walker
53:41
On a recent webinar about Navajo nation health disparities, there was reference to the declaration of independence and that language. It still stings.
Rebecca Baldwin
54:21
The Declaration of Independence states that “All men are Created Equal.” Most of the world were slave holders during that time. That was the cultural context of the time. Another thought question: What will future generations say about how we are dealing with the culture of our time?
Dana LeCuyer
56:25
Scribe - take notesFacilitator - ensure no one hogs the mic, follows ROTR;Unpacker - encourage deeper dive on idea that surfaced;Actioneer - collect next (small) action steps Who Does What By When
Jennifer Sykes
01:17:32
There!
Carol Roberts
01:17:33
Our group agreed the whole story is not being told and it does matter to the funding of sister universities in the same state.
Kimberly Moore
01:17:34
Great experience. We realized we didn't know the story and would want to start there. And we realized many groups would be left out.
Nick Place
01:17:34
We need to face and talk about the hard questions to get to the point where people can learn and grow in understanding, perspective, etc.
Noelle Guay
01:17:34
It was a lot to think about but we thought through some good action items we could do in our various roles.
Anna Brooks
01:17:34
there we go!
Henrique Mayer
01:17:49
;-)
Cassandra Key
01:17:51
I got it!
Kati Migliaccio
01:17:52
We would like to learn more about the land grant establishment so we can tell a more complete story.
Gail Somodi
01:17:55
learn more about our own history
Kathy Higgs
01:17:58
Dana is the best.
Diane Craig
01:17:59
we need to do something and not move on
Shirley Baker
01:18:04
We need to tell the whole story if the land grant institution is to be trusted.
Heather McAuslane
01:18:06
We don't really know the history of UF. Want to research it and develop a Wiki page that explains our symbols, routines, traditions to tell our story.
Craig Frey
01:18:07
this will be hard work
Max Williams
01:18:08
what is the whole story? in order to learn, we need to use a variety of primary sources
Mary Salinas
01:18:15
we would like UF to get the true and messy story out there
Tory Moore
01:18:18
develop/find a book club to continue reading and educating myself and having conversation
Denise Bogart
01:18:19
Acknowledge the truth about our painful past
Nicole Walker
01:18:21
We discussed the recent ending of prison labor in UF operations
Jennifer Sykes
01:18:22
Education is key -- how many people don't even know about this? You can't address issues you don't know exist.
Carolyn Jaeger
01:18:22
We have room for growth and a long way to go.We need to acknowledge the other state university that is land grant.Can't erase history and need to change the ending. It very much matters to future generations and still honor the mission we're doing. Be specific
Gail Somodi
01:18:23
effort into building relationships with community organizations, address digital divid
Samantha Hsu
01:18:26
We discussed the importance of transparency and communication. We also agreed that we need to have a continuous education process.
Ana Fajardo
01:18:27
It’s important to include diversity in leadership because they encourage acknowledging our differences and hearing other people’s stories
Ron Rice
01:18:29
The sentiment is that we address society needs, and advisory committees help ID the needs, yet it seems the needs persist over decades, no final solution and conclusion. Temporary bandaids?
Victoria Gibney
01:18:31
We talked about the importance of learning more about 1863 and 1890 LGUs and the history of UF and FAMU
Kathy Higgs
01:18:32
How do we do a better job of recruiting diversity
Anita Neal
01:18:32
violence takes action the need to identify differing views looking demographics of clientele. Are we teaching the students about the diversity of others and of the environment.
Nelly Nelson
01:18:33
That was a deep conversation and very in deep because we have a member with all the history knowledge.
Whitney Thames
01:18:33
Cultural Education
John Davis
01:18:34
Our history as a LGU is a very mixed bag, that was a surprise to all of us. We all IDd ways forward to build awareness of our history and build bridges with those disadvantaged by our history.
Sally Williams
01:18:35
Thank you Dana.
Ryan Chance
01:18:49
Definitely matters. Potential action steps to acknowledge the story -- learn more about local/state history (maybe in orientation). Explore relationship with Seminole tribe. Acknowledge the history in website and at live meetings (similar to start of NASPA meetings)
Dana LeCuyer
01:18:49
For those that asked, we will have the recording up on our website afterwards.
Andrea Moron Vasquez
01:18:58
We have a lot to learn. We need to hear the whole story from each other.
Brittany Avant
01:19:00
We need to learn more about our history as land grants but also need to take it upin ourselves to learn more about the history that is not always shared
Denise Bogart
01:19:01
Thank you Dana
Sally Williams
01:19:01
Breakout was very informative and thought provoking!
Jeanna Mastrodicasa
01:19:01
I think we realized we know very little about Florida history and we should include it at new employee orientation or somewhere similar!
Kimberly Bragg-Armatrout
01:19:03
Media takes control on what you know or don't know. By FEEDING YOU INFORMATION. It is up to us to learn.
Julio Pachon
01:19:05
We spoke about encouraging a wide variety of people to write their current perspectives
Julio Pachon
01:19:11
including ourselves
Wendy Meredith
01:19:14
Wonderful experience. Out thoughts were that the Land Grant needs to be better researched and taught completely. We need to learn more about the culture and background of all of our audience. It will take time; "One step at a time."
Dévonja Roberts
01:19:17
It was nice to speak with others who care that history isn't erased.. that history matters.. because it's how we move forward and make the needed changes to be inclusive and to treat everyone as they ought to be treated
Thomas Ruppert
01:19:27
Part of sharing our messy history with a diverse clientele is to engage in more hiring practices that allow those doing extension and teaching to better reflect our audiences.
Jessica Abbate
01:19:28
As one of by group members stated, that even though the past is not always a pleasant story we need that story to educate and move forward. Also education yourself better so you can try to educate others.
Britta Osborne
01:19:35
Needs assessement in extension feels like a revolving door. The report from 10 years ago seems as relevant as today. So how do we actually change when it feels like some of our work is a bandaid?
Jeanna Mastrodicasa
01:19:42
There is a "junior" version of the Stamped From the Beginning book aimed at younger audiences but it is an easier read for a challenging topic
Eric Hellgren
01:19:44
small action items included providing land grant history in Preview; having a 1-credit CALS course for all new students; develop online training module about land grant and UF history; consider using any land endowment funds for native American students
Henrique Mayer
01:19:51
could you write the names of the books/
Carolyn Jaeger
01:19:53
Please put book info in chat?
Gail Somodi
01:19:59
find alternative ways to reach everyone/digital divide issue
Jennifer Sykes
01:20:24
Eric, I love the idea of sharing info at Preview!
Diane Craig
01:20:27
ibram x kendi, stamped from beginning and youth version called Stamped
Dana LeCuyer
01:20:28
We'll have a list of resources also up on our website afterwards.
Jeanna Mastrodicasa
01:20:36
Ibram Kendi's books are two of the ones recommended. Stamped From the Beginning and How to be an AntiRacist
Jennifer Sykes
01:20:40
Racial Formation?
ANDRES VARELA
01:20:50
lol
Heather McAuslane
01:21:51
omi and winant racial formation
Jennifer Sykes
01:22:03
Thank you Heather
Allen Wysocki
01:25:31
Antonio, that is often my dilemma with what is the proper way to address African American or Black?
deborah Rousseau
01:26:08
I heard a comedian say "Native Americans" is a redundant title. If you are Native to that land..:)
Jennifer Sykes
01:26:09
Not the end-all, but the Associated Press is using Black.
Shirley Baker
01:26:59
First Nations?
Heather McAuslane
01:27:21
Canada uses First Nations.
Heather McAuslane
01:27:30
D
deborah Rousseau
01:27:32
C
janice watson
01:27:33
d
Ashley Kelly
01:27:33
C
Kimberly Moore
01:27:34
C
Karen Schlatter
01:27:34
F
Sharon Austin
01:27:34
C
Tara Wade
01:27:35
d
Noelle Guay
01:27:36
C
Diane Craig
01:27:37
F
Ryan Chance
01:27:37
D
Jean G Farmer
01:27:38
c
Daniella Voltaire
01:27:38
D
Cecilia Suarez
01:27:40
F
Wendy Meredith
01:27:41
c
Shirley Baker
01:27:42
D
Yvonne Florian
01:27:44
When speaking of "Representation", should that not be by the % of the national population to be represented properly?
Madan Oli
01:27:47
F
janice watson
01:28:21
Thank you Antonio
Diane Craig
01:29:24
If you look at data on UF Inst Planning website you see we have no moved the needle on % of Black faculty and students over the past 10 yrs despite a lot of talk about it
Diane Craig
01:29:32
not
Dana LeCuyer
01:31:40
If your question doesn't get addressed, we are saving the chat. Some of the questions require a deeper dive than we have time for today.
Susan Percival
01:33:21
Some universities refer to the APLU statement - where can we find that?
Dana LeCuyer
01:34:34
We'll find a link to the APLU statement and put that up with the resources.
Rebecca Baldwin
01:34:54
How does that fit demographically with the state of Florida? The census has 0.5% in that demographic group, so it may not be that far off demographically for the state population.
Dana LeCuyer
01:35:15
Breakout Prompt #2Land Grant Mission: Teach, Conduct Research and Provide Services to CommunitiesPresentWhat actions can we take to create a more just present for our students, our staff, our faculty, our communities? (Think small - get unstuck through individual, small next actions, then move to group, and then networked action)FutureHow do we live our land grant values by expanding access and equitable outcomes?
deborah Rousseau
01:42:51
LOL
Michele Powell
01:43:08
I know!
Diane Craig
01:43:39
This was great and I vow to take some action . Thank you
Ron Rice
01:44:22
Fastest 1.5 hour Zoom ever, great program. Eye-opener.
deborah Rousseau
01:44:29
Honesty, forgiveness & grace are a path to all healing!
Britta Osborne
01:44:44
Both of those are sooo good
Melissa Cordero
01:44:47
Absolutely amazing!
Melanie Thomas
01:44:47
Great job
Michele Powell
01:45:15
Yes honesty, forgiveness, grace, validation and respect
Rose Morales
01:45:17
This was an amazing webinar! Thank you
Noelle Guay
01:45:58
Thank you, Antonio. This has been so valuable. I hope to see more sessions like this!
janice watson
01:46:00
This was one of the best zoom meetings yet, Thank you Dr Farias
Jennifer Sykes
01:46:01
Thank you so much!
Heather McAuslane
01:46:04
Thank you!
Samantha Hsu
01:46:07
Thank you!
Nelly Nelson
01:46:08
Thank you it was a great opportunity for us!
Michael Gutter
01:46:10
Thank you so much!
Belinda Scurlock
01:46:11
Thank you!
Carol Roberts
01:46:11
@Ron, Right! Thank you Dr. Farias.
Evelyn Espinal
01:46:12
Thank you
Sharon Machuca
01:46:14
Thank you!
Jennifer Sykes
01:46:15
I walked away with a reading list!
Allen Wysocki
01:46:15
Thank you Antonio
Cassandra Key
01:46:18
Thank you very much!
deborah Rousseau
01:46:19
Thank you very much. Excellent!
Michele Powell
01:46:19
Very good webinar-thank you for your time!
Colby Silvert
01:46:19
Thank you! Great to learn and discuss!
Amarat Simonne
01:46:21
Thank you for a great session.
Christine Chen-Luke
01:46:22
Thank you!
Henrique Mayer
01:46:23
thanks a lot. best webinar during covid! :-)
Rebecca Baldwin
01:46:25
Promote gratitude to make a better present and future.
Anita Neal
01:46:28
Thank you very much for this discussion
Max Williams
01:46:29
Excellent- thank you! respectful, enlightening, and informative
Cecilia Suarez
01:46:29
Thank you so much Antonio!
Jean G Farmer
01:46:30
Thank you that was great!
Eva Bolton
01:46:31
Enjoyed this very much.
ANDRES VARELA
01:46:32
Thank you!
Elisabeth Simonise
01:46:35
Great explanations! Thank you!
janice watson
01:46:39
Wish we had more time
Mary Jane Lukas
01:46:42
Thank you!
Jessica Abbate
01:46:42
Thank you Antonio, this was a great webinar
Dévonja Roberts
01:46:43
Thank you! It is important to have these conversations.. thank you for educating us and teaching the messy truth!
Carolyn Jaeger
01:46:45
Thank you! And thank you Dana!
Nicole Walker
01:46:59
Thanks Antonio and Dana
Jennifer Sykes
01:47:02
Great job Dana!
Dana LeCuyer
01:47:03
Welcome!
Karen Schlatter
01:47:18
Will there be follow up to this?
Andrea Moron Vasquez
01:47:29
Thanks Antonio and the breakroom team: Courtney, Eva and Diane.
Brittany Avant
01:47:32
Great job! Thank you for a very informative webinar
Kathy Higgs
01:47:33
Thank you Antonio
Gerardo Celis
01:47:49
Thank you!
Ed Skvarch
01:47:50
I have learned a lot today ..thanks Antonio
Nick Place
01:47:52
Thanks much Antonio, Denise and Dana!
Yvette Polite-Dennis
01:47:53
Thank you Antonio Farais, great meeting you in a short breakout.. Lol Great
Cassandra Key
01:47:54
Thank you!
Peggy Geren
01:47:57
This was a great exercise and topic! We need to know both sides of every story and get educated so we can be fair and educate others into solutions and fairness